Patriotic Customs






From The New Age Magazine, Published monthly by the Supreme Council 33 
deg.,  Ancient  and  Accepted Scottish Rite of  Freemasonry,  Southern 
Jurisdiction, U.S.A., 1733 Sixteenth St. NW., Washington, D.C. 200009.

Title 36, Chapter 10, Patriotic Customs

Par. 170. National Anthem; Star-Spangled Banner
     The  composition  consisting of the words and music known as  The 
Star  Spangled Banner is designated the national anthem of the  United 
States of America.

Par. 171. Conduct during playing (anthem)
     During  rendition  of  the  national  anthem  when  the  flag  is 
displayed,  all  present  except  those  in uniform  should  stand  at 
attention facing the flag with the right hand over the heart.  Men not 
in  uniform  should remove their headdress with their right  hand  and 
hold it at the left shoulder, the hand being over the heart.   Persons 
in  uniform should render the military salute at the first note of the 
anthem and retain this position until the last note.  When the flag is 
not  displayed,  those present should face toward the music and act at 
the same manner they would if the flag were displayed there.
               
                    Amendment

Par. 172. Pledge of allegiance to the flag; manner of delivery
     The Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag, "I pledge allegiance to the 
Flag of the United States of America, and to the Republic for which it 
stands,  one Nation under God,  indivisible,  with liberty and justice 
for all.", should be rendered by standing at attention facing the flag 
with  the right hand over the heart.   When not in uniform men  should 
remove  their headdress with their right hand and hold it at the  left 
shoulder,  the  hand being over the heart.   Persons in uniform should 
remain silent, face the flag, and render the military salute.

Par. 174. Time and occasions for display

(a)   Display  on buildings and stationary flagstaffs in  open;  night 
display
     It  is the universal custom to display the flag only from sunrise 
to  sunset  on  buildings and on stationary flagstaffs  in  the  open.  
However, when a patriotic effect is desired, the flag may be displayed 
twenty-four  hours  a day if properly illuminated during the hours  of 
darkness.

Par. 176. Respect for the flag

     No disrespect should be shown to the flag of the United States of 
America;  the  flag  should  not  be dipped to any  person  or  thing.  
Regimental  colors,  State  flags,  and organization or  institutional 
flags are to be dipped as a mark of honor.
(a)  The flag should never be displayed with the union down, except as 
a  signal  of dire distress in instances of extreme danger to life  or 
property.
(b)   The  flag  should never touch anything beneath it,  such as  the 
ground, the floor, water, or merchandise.
(c)  The flag should never be carried flat or horizontally, but always 
aloft and free.
(d)   The  flag should never be used as wearing apparel,  bedding,  or 
drapery.  It should never be festooned, drawn back, nor up,  in folds, 
but  always allowed to fall free.   Bunting of blue,  white,  and red, 
always arranged with the blue above, the white in the middle,  and the 
red below,  should be used for covering a speaker's desk,  draping the 
front of the platform, and for decoration in general.
(i)   The  flag  should never be used for advertising purposes in  any 
manner  whatsoever.   It should not be embroidered on such articles as 
cushions or handkerchiefs and the like, printed or otherwise impressed 
on  paper napkins or boxes or anything that is designed for  temporary 
use and discard.   Advertising signs should not be fastened to a staff 
or halyard from which the flag is flown.
(j)   No part of the flag should ever be used as a costume or athletic 
uniform.   However,  a  flag  patch may be affixed to the  uniform  of 
military  personnel,  firemen,  policemen,  and  members of  patriotic 
organizations.   The  flag  represents a living country and is  itself 
considered  a  living thing.   Therefore,  the lapel flag pin being  a 
replica, should be worn on the left lapel near the heart.
(k)   The  flag,  when it is in such condition that it is no longer  a 
fitting  emblem for display,  should be destroyed in a dignified  way, 
preferably by burning.

            Proc. No. 2605. The Flag of the United States

     Proc. No. 2605,  Feb.  18,  1944,  9 F.R.  1957,  58 Stat.  1126, 
provided:
     The flag of the United States of America is universally represen-
tative  of  the  principles of the  justice,  liberty,  and  democracy 
enjoyed by the people of the United States; and
     People all over the world recognize the flag of the United States 
as sybolic of the United States; and
     The  effective  prosecution of the war requires a  proper  under-
standing  by the people of other countries of the material  assistance 
being given by the Government of the United States:

     NOW  THEREFORE,  by  virtue  of  the power vested in  me  by  the 
Constitution and laws of the United States,  particularly by the Joint 
Resolution approved June 22, 1942,  as amended by the Joint Resolution 
approved  December 22,  1942 [sections 171 to 178 of this  title],  as 
President and Commander in Chief, it is hereby proclaimed as follows:
     1.   The  use  of the flag of the United States or any  represen-
tation thereof, if approved by the Foreign Economic Administration, on 
labels, packages, cartons, cases,  or other containers for articles or 
products  of the United States intended for export as lend-lease  aid, 
as  relief  and rehabilitation aid,  or as emergency supplies for  the 
Territories   and  possessions  of  the  United  States,   or  similar  
purposes,  shall  be considered a proper use of the flag of the United 
States and consistent with the honor and respect due to the flag.
     2.  If any article or product so labelled,  packaged or otherwise 
bearing  the flag of the United States or any representation  thereof, 
as provided for in section 1,  should,  be force of circumstances,  be 
diverted  to the ordinary channels of domestic trade,  no person shall 
be considered as violation rules and customs pertaining to the display 
of the flag of the United States, as set forth in the Joint Resolution 
approved June 22,  1942,  as amended by the joint Resolution appproved 
December 22, 1942, (U.S.C., Supp. II,  title 36,  secs.  171-178)  for 
possessing,  transporting,  displaying,  selling  or otherwise  trans-
ferring any such article orproduct solely because the label,  package, 
carton case, or other container bears the flag of the United States or 
any representation thereof.


"United  States Code (1982 Edition),"   New Age Magazine,  XCVI,  June 
1988, 54-64.