The Harvey Ritual

William Harvey’s The Complete Manual of Freemasonry was first published in 1917 and was reprinted several times without any changes to the numerous grammatical and typographical errors it contains. This online version has been edited and reformatted for clarity. The Complete Manual of Freemasonry, containing the Mark Degree and additional lectures and materials, is available from the Grand Lodge of Scotland.

First DegreeSecond DegreeThird Degree

THE FIRST DEGREE

THE OPENING OF THE LODGE

The Right Worshipful Master, having satisfied himself that the Office-bearers are properly clothed and in their respective positions, rises in the E, gives o... k... with the m....

R.W.M. — Brethren, assist me to open this Lodge.

All the Members stand to attention.

R.W.M. — W.J.W., what is the first duty in a Lodge of E.A.M.s?

W.J.W. — To see that the Lodge is properly tyled.

R.W.M. — You will direct that duty to be done.

W.J.W. — Bro. I.G., You will see that the Lodge is properly tyled.

The I.G. thereupon gives one k..., which is responded to by the T., who gives one k....

I.G. — W.J.W., the Lodge is properly tyled.

W.J.W. — R.W.M., the Lodge is properly tyled.

R.W.M. — W.S.W., what is the next duty?

W.S.W. — To see that none but M...s are present, that they are properly clothed, and stand to order as E.A.M....s when called upon, R.W.M.

R.W.M. — Are you satisfied that all present are M...s, and that they are properly clothed?

W.S.W. — I am, R.W.M.

R.W.M. — Then to order, Br., as E.A.M.s.

The Brethren give the s... of an E.A., which is returned by the R.W.M.

R.W.M. — I acknowledge the correctness of the s....

R.W.M. — W.S.W., how many Officers constitute a Lodge of E.A.M....s?

W.S.W. — Seven or more — namely, the S. and J.W....s, the S. and J.D..., the I.G. and the O.G. or T.

R.W.M. — W.J.W., what is the situation of the O.G. or T.?

W.J.W. — Outside the door of the Lodge, R.W.M.

R.W.M. — What is his duty?

W.J.W. — Being armed with a drawn sword he is to keep off all cowans and eavesdroppers, and see that the Candidates come properly prepared, R.W.M.

R.W.M. — Br. I.G., where is your constant place?

I.G. — Within the entrance of the Lodge, R.W.M.

R.W.M. — What is your duty?

I.G. — To admit Brethren on proof, receive Candidates in due form, and obey the commands of the W.J.W., R.W.M.

R.W.M. — Br. J.D., where is your constant place?

J.D. — At the right of, or near, the W.S.W. in the W..., R.W.M.

R.W.M. — What is your duty?

J.D. — To carry all messages and communications of the R.W.M, from the W.S.W. to the W.J.W., and see the same punctually obeyed, R.W.M.

R.W.M. — Br. S.D., where is your constant place.

S.D. — At the right of, or near, the R.W.M. in the R.W.M.

R.W.M. — What is your duty?

S.D. — To bear all messages and commands from the R.W.M. to the W.S.W., and to wait the return of the J.D., R.W.M.

R.W.M. — W.J.W., where is your constant place in the Lodge?

W.J.W. — In the S..., R.W.M.

R.W.M. — Why are you so placed?

W.J.W. — To mark the sun in its meridian, to call the Brethren from labour to refreshment, and from refreshment to labour again, so that profit and pleasure may be the result, R.W.M.

R.W.M. — W.S.W., your constant place in the Lodge?

W.S.W. — In the W..., R.W.M.

R.W.M. — Why are you so placed?

W.S.W. — To mark the setting sun, to close the Lodge at the R.W.M.’s command, after having seen that every Brother has had his just and lawful due, R.W.M.

R.W.M. — W.P.M., where is the Master’s place in the Lodge?

W.P.M. — In the E., R.W.M.

R.W.M. — Why is he so placed?

W.P.M. — As the sun rises in the East to open and enliven the day, so is the R.W.M. placed in the East to open the Lodge, to employ and instruct the Brethren in Freemasonry.

R.W.M. — Brethren, so stand I, and the Lodge being thus duly constituted, before I declare it open, let us invoke a blessing from the G.... A.... of the U.... on all our undertakings.

Chaplain — May our labours thus begun in order, be conducted in peace, and closed in harmony.

Brethren — So mote it be.

R.W.M. — Brethren, in the name of the G.... A.... of the U...., and in virtue of my position as Master, I declare this Lodge duly opened for the purposes of Freemasonry in the First Degree, and this I do by —

The R.W.M. gives three k... with the m... which are followed by three k... by the W.S.W., and three k... by the W.J.W., after which the I.G. gives three k... which are responded to by the T.

R.W.M. — And this, Brethren, shall be your s....

He gives the s... which is responded to by the Brethren.

R.W.M. — Be seated, Brethren.

The Brethren seat themselves, the W.J.W. lowers his column, the V.S.L. is opened at the proper place, and the c... and s... are placed in position.

It is usual at this point for the R.W.M. to invite any visiting R.W.M. or P.M. to take a seat in the E.

In some Lodges it is customary to sing an opening psalm or hymn but, as each lodge which follows this practice has its own special favourite selection, no purpose would be served by introducing here any particular effusion.

CEREMONY OF INITIATION

In the preparing room adjoining the Lodge the Candidate is divested of all m... and m... s... He is h... w... His r... a..., l... b..., and l... k... are b..., his r... h... is s...p- s...d, and a c... t... is placed about his n.... He is then led to the d... of the Lodge, when his conductor, the J.D., who has supervised his preparations, gives three k...

I.G. — W.J.W., there is a report at the preparing-room door.

W.J.W. — R.W.M., there is a report at the preparing-room door.

R.W.M. — Brother S.D., you will attend to the report.

The S.D. gives the s... and retires and interrogates the Conductor.

S.D. — Who comes here?

Conductor — Mr A.B., a poor Candidate in a state of total d...s, who has been well and worthily recommended, regularly proposed and approved of in open Lodge, now comes of his own free will and accord, humbly soliciting to be admitted to the mysteries and privileges of ancient Freemasonry.

S.D. — How does he hope to obtain these privileges?

Conductor — By the help of God, being free born and of good report.

S.D. — Do you vouch he comes properly prepared?

Conductor — I do.

S.D. — Let him wait till I make a report to the R.W.M.

The S.D. then re-enters the Lodge, advances to the centre and gives three k... with his rod.

R.W.M.——Who comes, who comes, who comes here?

S.D. — Mr A.B., a poor Candidate, &c.

R.W.M. — How does he hope to obtain these privileges?

S.D. — By the help of God, being free born and of good report.

R.W.M. — The tongue of good report has already been heard in his favour; do you, Bro. S.D., vouch that he comes properly prepared?

S.D. — I do.

R.W.M. — Then let him be admitted in due form. Take heed upon what he enters. Brethren, be upstanding to receive the Candidate.

The Brethren stand at the s... of f.... The Candidate is brought within the Lodge, and the S.B., approaches him.

S.B. — Mr A.B., in the name of the G... A... of the U..., and by command of the R.W.M., enter this L... of E.A.M.s on the p... of a s... i... pressed to your n... l... b..., and as this is a prick to your f..., so may the recollection of it prove a torture to your conscience should you ever attempt to reveal the secrets of F... unlawfully.

The Candidate is conducted to the centre of the Lodge.

R.W.M. — Mr A.B., as no person can be made a Mason unless he is a free man and of mature age, I demand to know if you are free, and of the full age of twenty-one years.

Candidate — I am.

R.W.M. — Thus assured, you will kneel while the blessing of Heaven is invoked in aid of our proceedings. Brethren, let us pray.

The candidate kneels on a cushion which has been placed for his convenience, while the J.D. allows his hand to rest lightly upon the candidate’s head.

Chaplain — Vouchsafe Thine aid, Almighty Father and Supreme Ruler of the Universe, to this our present assembly, and grant that this Candidate for Freemasonry may so dedicate and devote his life to Thy service, as to become a true and faithful Brother among us. Endow him with a competency of thy Divine Wisdom, so that, assisted by the secrets of our Masonic art, he may be the better enabled to display the beauties of true holiness to the honour and glory of Thy most Holy Name.

Brethren — So mote it be.

R.W.M. — In all cases of doubt, difficulty and danger, in whom do you put your trust?

Candidate — In God.

R.W.M. — Your trust being in God, your faith is well founded. Relying on such sure support you may safely arise and follow your leader, with a firm but humble confidence, for where the name of God is invoked, we trust no danger can ensue. Arise and follow your guide.

The J.D. conducts the Candidate to the W.J.W.’s pedestal and gives three k... with his rod.

W.J.W. — Who comes, who comes, who comes here?

J.D. — Mr A.B., a poor Candidate, &c.

W.J.W. — How does he hope to obtain these privileges?

J.D. — By the help of God, being free born and of good report.

W.J.W. — The tongue of good report has already been heard in his favour. Do you, Brother Deacon, vouch that he comes duly and truly prepared?

J.D. — Duly and truly prepared.

W.J.W. — In whom does he put his trust?

J.D. — In God.

W.J.W. — Seeing he puts his trust in God, you may safely pass to the W.

The J.D, conducts the Candidate to the W.S.W.’s pedestal where the same examination is made. Thereafter the W.S.W. gives one k... and addresses the R.W.M.

W.S.W. — R.W.M., I have here Mr A.B., duly and truly prepared to take the oath and obligation of an E.A.M.

R.W.M. — W.S.W., you will instruct the J.D. to conduct Mr A.B. to the E. in due and ancient form.

W.S.W. — Brother J.D., it is the R.W.M.’s command that you conduct Mr A.B. once round the inside of this worshipful and warranted Lodge to show to the Brethren that he is duly and truly prepared, and thereafter teach him to advance to the E. as you, yourself, were taught.

Preceded by the S.B., who salutes the R.W.M. and Wardens as he passes them, the J.D. conducts the Candidate once round the Lodge and then brings him up towards the a.... Thereafter he addresses him thus:

Mr A.B., the proper way to advance to the E. in this degree is by taking one r... s.... You will s... off with the l... f... and bring the h... of the r... into the h... of the l....

The Candidate does so.

J.D. — R.W.M., I now present to you Mr A.B., a Candidate properly prepared to take the oath and obligation of an E.A.M.

R.W.M. — Brother D., your presentation shall be attended to, but I will first address a few questions to the Candidate, which I trust he will answer with candour.

R.W.M. — Mr A.B., Do you serious declare on your honour that unbiassed by the improper solicitations of friends against your own inclination, and uninfluenced by any mercenary or other unworthy motive, you freely and voluntarily offer yourself as a Candidate for the mysteries and privileges of ancient Freemasonry?

Candidate — I do.

R.W.M. — Do you likewise declare that you are prompted to solicit these privileges from a favourable opinion preconceived of the Institution, a general desire for knowledge, and a sincere wish to render yourself more extensively serviceable to your fellow men?

Candidate — I do.

R.W.M. — You have stated that you place your trust in God. Do you believe in the binding sanctity of an oath taken in that holy Being’s name?

Candidate — I do.

R.W.M. — Do you further seriously declare upon your honour that, avoiding fear on the one hand, and rashness on the other, you will steadily persevere through the ceremony of your initiation, and, if once admitted, will ever afterwards act and abide by the ancient usages and established customs of the Order?

Candidate — I do.

R.W.M. — Then you will s... the s... from off your l... f... and hand it to me,

The Candidate does so.

R.W.M. — Mr A.B., an explanation of this act will be given to you at a later point in our ceremonial. It is now my duty to inform you that Masonry is free, and requires a perfect freedom of inclination in every candidate for its mysteries. It is founded on the purest principles of piety and virtue, and possesses many great and valuable privileges; but, in order to secure these privileges to worthy men, and we trust, to worthy men only, vows of fidelity are required; but let me assure you these vows are not incompatible with your moral, your civil, or your religious duties. Are you, then, willing to take a solemn obligation, founded on the principles I have stated, to keep inviolate the secrets and mysteries of our venerable Order?

Candidate—I am.

R.W.M. — Then you will k... on your l... k..., place your r... f... in the form of a s..., place your l... h... under, and your r... h... upon this B..., which is the V.S.L.

The Candidate does so. The l...s are extinguished with the exception of the t... l... l...s, which are now lit.

R.W.M. — Now, Mr A, B., I presume you are kneeling at the a... of Freemasonry for the first time?

Candidate — I am.

R.W.M. — Then, you will begin this Obligation by using the personal pronoun “I,” repeating your name at length and saying after me —

I, A.B., in the presence of the G. A. of the U., and in the body of this warranted and Worshipful Lodge of Ancient, Free, and Accepted Masons regularly assembled, properly constituted, and dedicated to the memory of the Holy Saints John, do, of my own free will and accord, hereby, hereat, and hereon solemnly and sincerely promise, vow and swear that I will always hele, conceal, and never improperly reveal any of the secrets or mysteries of or belonging to Ancient Freemasonry which may be known by me, shall now, or may at any future time be communicated to me, except it be to a true and lawful Brother or Brothers, and not even unto him or them until after due trial, strict examination, or a full conviction that he or they are worthy of that confidence, or in the body of a Lodge, just, perfect, and regular. I further solemnly promise that I will not write these secrets, print, cut, carve, engrave, enamel, or otherwise delineate them, or cause, or suffer the same to be done by others if in my power to prevent it, upon anything movable or immovable under the canopy of heaven, whereby or whereon any letter, character, or figure may become legible or intelligible to myself or to anyone in the World, so that the secrets of Freemasonry might be unlawfully obtained, and that through my unworthiness. I further solemnly promise that I will not be at the making of, the following persons as Freemasons:— a young man of nonage, an old man of dotage, a madman, a fool, an atheist, a person under the influence of liquor, and a woman under no pretence whatever. I likewise solemnly pledge myself to support and maintain the Laws and Constitution of the Grand Lodge of Scotland, and promise strict obedience to the Office-bearers and Bye-Laws of this Lodge ----- No. ---, which I shall always acknowledge as my Mother Lodge. To all these points I solemnly swear fidelity, without evasion, equivocation, or any mental reservation whatsoever, under the penalty of having, etc. So help me A.G., and keep me steadfast in this the solemn obligation of an E.A.M.

R.W.M. — As a pledge of inviolable fidelity you will seal this obligation on the V. of the S.L. Kiss the V. once.

The Candidate does so.

R.W.M. — Brother A.B., in your present situation, what do you most desire?

Candidate — L....

R.W.M. — Br. J.D., let that blessing be restored to the Candidate.

The J.D. restores the l....

R.W.M. — You now see the p... position in which you are placed, when kneeling at the a... of Freemasonry for the first time. By your meek and candid behaviour you have escaped two great dangers, those of d... by s... and s.... When you entered the Lodge this s... was pointed to your n... l... b.... Had you rashly advanced you might have met your d... by s..., the fault for which would have been your own and not that of the Brother who held the s..., as he should only have remained firm to his post of duty. The s... in its emblematical sense reminds the Freemason that though his thoughts, words, and actions may be hid from the eyes of mortal men, yet nothing is hidden from the All-seeing Eye of T... G... A... O... T... U..., and that Divine justice will sooner or later overtake us all and reward or punish us according as we have obeyed or disregarded the Divine commands. You have likewise a c... t... about your n.... Had you been refractory and endeavoured to retreat you might have met your death by s..., the fault again being your own and not that of him who held the c.... The c... t... with the r... n... is emblematical of the uncertainty of life and should teach us to prepare for the great call which comes at an hour we cannot forecast.

The c... t... and s... are removed.

R.W.M. — These dangers are now removed but there is a third danger which I cannot remove, and which will attend you to the latest hour of your life. It is the p... of your o..., but from what we have heard of you we believe that p... will never require to be inflicted. Having been restored to the blessing of material l..., let me direct your attention to what we esteem the t... g..., though emblematical l... in Freemasonry, namely, the V... of the S... L..., the S..., and the C.... The V... S... L... is to rule and govern our faith; the S... to regulate our actions; and the C... to keep us in due bounds with all mankind, particularly our Brethren in Freemasonry. You are now enabled to discover the t... l... l..., which are depicted by three lighted candles, situated in the E., S., and W., and are meant to represent the Sun, the Moon, and the Master of the Lodge — the Sun to rule the day, the Moon to govern the night, and the R.W.M. to rule and govern the Lodge. You may be asked “Did you see any other light?” If so, you will reply, saying “Yes, I saw a Brother advance from the E. saying ‘Rise, newly obligated Brother among Masons’."

The R.W.M., suiting action to the words, takes the Candidate by the r... h... and raises him. The brethren who have been standing at the s... of f... now resume their seats. The t... l... l...s are extinguished, and the main l...s are now restored.

R.W.M. — The s... of the s... alludes to an ancient custom in Israel. When the ancient Israelite was about to seal a compact or bargain he s... the s... from off his l... f... and handed it to his neighbour in token of his f.... Similarly, we asked you to hand it over to us as a symbol of your f... with regard to things Masonic. Should you be asked at any time, as a catch question, “What did you pay for Freemasonry?” you will remember to answer, “An o... s..., an o... s... of my m....”

The R.W.M. hands over the s... which the Candidate puts on.

R.W.M. — Having taken the great and solemn obligation of an E.A. Mason I am now at liberty to inform you that there are several degrees in Freemasonry, with peculiar s... restricted to each. These are not communicated indiscriminately, but are conferred upon Candidates according to merit and abilities. I shall now proceed to instruct you with the s... of this degree, or those marks by which Masons are known to each other throughout the length and breadth of the land, and distinguished from the rest of the world by night as well as by day, but must premise for your general observation that all s... l... and p... are true and proper signs by which to know a Mason. You are therefore expected to stand perfectly erect, with your f... in the form of a s..., your body being thus considered an emblem of your mind, and your f... of the rectitude of your actions. You will now take a short p... with your l... f... bringing the r... h... into the hollow of the l.... That is called the first regular s... in Freemasonry, and it is in that position the s... of this degree are communicated. They consist of a s..., a g... or t..., and a w.... The s... is given by placing the h..., etc.

The R.W.M. having instructed the candidate as to the s..., adds — That is the s... with which you salute the Master on your entering or retiring from a Lodge working in this degree. Your approach the c..., salute the R.W.M. in this manner (illustrating the method), and then take your seat among the brethren or retire as the case may be.

R.W.M. — The g... or t... is given thus .... It demands a w..., a w... which is highly prized amongst Masons as a guard to their privileges. Too much caution, therefore, cannot be observed in communicating it. You must never give it in full, but by l... or h.... As in the course of the ceremony you may be called on for this w..., the J.D. will instruct you how to proceed.

R.W.M. (gives the g... and asks) — What is this?

J.D. — The g... or t... of an E.A.F.

R.W.M. — What does it demand?

J.D. — A w....

R.W.M. Will you give me the w...?

J.D. — No; at my initiation I was taught to be cautious as to how I used the w....

R.W.M. — How will you dispose of it?

J.D. — Knowing you to be a Brother, I will l... or h... it with you.

R.W.M. — Will you give me a l...?

J.D. — No, you being my interrogator, you will please begin.

The w... is given, each giving a l... alternately.

R.W.M. — This w... is derived from the l... h... p... at the p... or e... to K... S...’s T..., so named after ----- , the g... g... of D..., a P... and ruler in I..., and the import of the word is etc. If you are asked “What is the use of a Mason’s l... h...?" you will remember that it is to c... his w.... Brother J.D., you may now take the Candidate to the Wardens for instruction.

The J.D. takes the Candidate to the W.J.W, and says, W.J.W., I present to you Br. A.B. on his initiation.

W.J.W. — You will advance to me as an E.A, Mason. (Can. takes the s...)

W.J.W. — Do you bring anything with you?

Can. — A s....

W.J.W. — Will you give me the first part of the s...?

Can. — I will (and he gives it).

W.J.W. — What part of the s... is that?

Can. — The h... s...

W.J.W. — To what does it allude?

Can. — To the position in which my h...s were when k... at the a..., etc.

W.J.W. — Will you complete the s...?

Can. — I will. (and he completes it)

W.J.W. — What part of the s... is that?

Can. — The p... part.

W.J.W. — And what is the p...?

Can. — That I would have my t... cut, etc.

W.J.W. — Have you anything else to communicate?

Can. — I have. (Gives the g...)

W.J.W. — What is this?

Can. — The g... or t... of an E.A.M.

W.J.W. — What does it demand?

Can. — A w....

W.J.W. — Give me the w....

Can. — At my initiation I was taught to be cautious.

W.J.W. — How will you dispose of it?

Can. — I will l... or h... it with you.

W.J.W. — Give me a l....

Can. — You being my interrogator, you begin.

The w... is disposed of after which the W.J.W, says:

W.J.W. — Brother J.D., you may safely pass to the W.

The J.D. takes the Candidate to the W.S.W, where the same ceremony is gone through.

W.S.W.(gives one k...) R.W.M., I present to you Brother A.B., on his initiation, for some further mark of your favour.

R.W.M. — W.S.W., I delegate to you the duty of investing our Brother with the distinguishing badge of a Mason.

W.S.W. — Brother A.B., in the name of the G... A... of the U..., and by command of the R.W.M., I invest you with the distinguishing badge of a Mason. It is more ancient than the Golden Fleece or the Roman Eagle, more honourable than the Order of the Garter, or any other Order in existence, it being the badge of Innocence, and the bond of Friendship, and I strongly exhort you ever to wear and consider it as such. You will observe that this apron is made of lamb’s skin, and as the Lamb has been in all ages the acknowledged emblem of Innocence and Purity, it should remind you of that purity of life and action which should at all times distinguish a Freemason. I trust that you may live for many years to wear that badge with pleasure to yourself, usefulness to the Craft, and honour to the Lodge in which you have been initiated; and let me further exhort you never to disgrace it, for you may be assured that it will never disgrace you.

R.W.M. — I must add to the observations of the W.S.W. that you are never to put on that badge should you be about to enter a Lodge in which there is a Brother with whom you are at variance, or towards whom you entertain any animosity. In such cases it is expected that you will invite the Brother to withdraw, so that you may settle your differences amicably, which, if happily effected, you may then clothe yourselves, enter the Lodge, and work together with that love and harmony which should at all times characterise Freemasons. If, however, your differences are of such a nature as not to be so easily adjusted, it were better that one or both of you should retire, than that the harmony of the Lodge should be disturbed by your presence.

R.W.M. — Bro. J.D., you will now conduct the Candidate to the N.E. part of the Lodge.

The Candidate is conducted there.

R.W.M. — It is customary at the erection of all stately and superb edifices to lay the foundation stone in the N.E. corner of the building. You, being newly admitted into Freemasonry, are placed there, figuratively to represent that stone; and on the foundation laid this evening, may you raise a superstructure perfect in all its parts, and honourable to the builder. You now stand to all external appearance a just and upright man and Mason, and I give it to you in terms of strong recommendation ever to continue to act as such. Indeed, I shall immediately proceed to put your principles in some measure to the test by calling upon you to exercise that virtue, which may justly be denominated the distinguishing characteristic of a Freemason’s heart — I mean Charity. I trust I need not here dilate on its excellence. Doubtless it has often been felt and practised by you. Suffice it to say that it has the approbation of heaven and earth; and, like its sister Mercy, is twice blessed, blessing him who gives as well as him who receives. In a society so widely extended as that of Freemasonry, whose branches are spread over the four quarters of the globe, it cannot be denied that we have many Brethren of rank and riches among us, neither can it be concealed that among the thousands who range under its banners there are many who, perhaps from circumstances of unforeseen misfortune and calamity, are reduced to the lowest state of poverty and distress. In their behalf it is our usual custom to awaken the kindly feelings of every Initiate, by making such a claim on his charity as his circumstances in life may fairly warrant. Anything, therefore, that you may feel disposed to give, if you will deposit it with the J.D., it will be thankfully received and, I can assure you, faithfully applied.

The J.D. appeals to the Can., who states that he has been deprived of his m... etc. The J.D. then asks if he would give were it in his power, to which the Can. replies in the affirmative. The J.D, reports the same to the R.W.M.

R.W.M. (to Can.) — I congratulate you on the honourable sentiments by which you are actuated, likewise on the inability which precludes you at this moment from gratifying them. Believe me, this trial was not made with the view of sporting with your feelings: far be it from us any such intention. But it was done for three special reasons — first, to put your principles to the test; secondly, to evince to the Brethren that you had neither m... nor m... substance about you, for, if you had had, the ceremony thus far of your initiation must have been repeated; and thirdly, as a warning to your own heart, that should you at any time meet a poor Brother who may deservedly claim your assistance, you will recall the particular moment when you were admitted into Masonry, p... and p..., and cheerfully embrace the opportunity of practising towards him that virtue which you have just professed to admire.

The J.D, now conducts the Candidate to the front of the a....

R.W.M. — I now present to you the working tools of an A... which are the 24-inch Gauge, the Mallet, and the Chisel. The 24-inch Gauge is used by the operative mason to measure and lay out his work, so as to compute the time and labour it may cost. The Mallet is an important instrument of labour, and no work of manual skill can be completed without it. With the Chisel the expert Craftsman gives form and regularity to the shapeless mass of stone: it is capable of making impression on the hardest substance, and the mightiest structures are indebted to its aid. But as we are not Operative, but Free and Accepted or Speculative Masons, we apply these tools in a moral sense. Thus, from the 24-inch Gauge we learn a daily lesson of admonition and instruction, for as it is divided into 24 equal parts, it reminds us of the 24 hours of the day, and directs us to apply them to their proper objects — namely prayer, labour, refreshment and sleep. The Mallet teaches us that skill without exertion is of little avail, that labour is the lot of man, for the heart may conceive, and the head devise in vain, if the hand be not prompt to execute the design. From the Chisel we learn that perseverance is necessary to establish perfection, that the rude material receives its fine polish but from repeated efforts alone, and that nothing short of untiring exertion can induce the habit of virtue, enlighten the mind, and purify the soul. From the whole we deduce this moral: that knowledge grounded on accuracy, aided by labour, and prompted by perseverance, will finally overcome all difficulties, raise ignorance from its native darkness, and establish happiness in the paths of life.

R.W.M. — As in the course of the ceremony you have been called on for certain fees for your initiation, it is right and proper that you should know by what authority we act. This, which I show to you, is our Charter from Grand Lodge, empowering us to make Masons and collect fees. This is a copy of the Laws and Constitutions of Grand Lodge, and this is a print of our Bye-laws, both of which I recommend to your careful perusal; as by the large one which lies in the Lqdge, and may be consulted at any convenient moment, you will be taught the duties you owe to the Craft in general, and by the small one those you owe to this Lodge in particular.

At this point it is customary in some Lodges for the R.W.M. to inform the initiate that he may now retire and restore himself to his p... c... and thereafter return to the Lodge when his attention will be directed to a charge founded upon the excellence of the Institution and the qualications of its members. In other Lodges the ceremony is completed without interruption. Occasionally the charge is omitted for lack of time, but this should never be done if it can be avoided. The charge is the crown of the Degree.

CHARGE AFTER INITIATION

R.W.M. — Having passed through the ceremony of your Initiation, allow me to congratulate you on being admitted a member of our Ancient and Honourable Society. Ancient it no doubt it is, having subsisted from time immemorial; and honourable it must be acknowledged to be, as by a natural tendency it conduces to make so all those who are obedient to its precepts. Indeed, no Institution can boast a more solid foundation than that on which Freemasonry rests — the practice of every moral and social virtue; and to so high an eminence has its credit been advanced, that in every age Monarchs themselves have been promoters of the Art — they have not thought it derogatory to their dignity to exchange the Sceptre for the Trowel, they have patronised our mysteries, and have even joined our assemblies.

As a Freemason I would first recommend to your serious contemplation the V... of the S... L..., charging you to consider it the unerring standard of Truth and justice, and to regulate your actions by the Divine precepts it contains. Therein you will be taught the important duties you owe to God, to your neighbour, and to yourself — To God, by never mentioning His name but with that awe and reverence which are due from the creature to his Creator, by imploring His divine aid in all your lawful undertakings, and by looking up to him in every emergency for comfort and support; to your Neighbour, by always acting with him on the square, by rendering him every kind office which justice or Mercy may require, by relieving his necessities, soothing his afflictions, and by doing unto him as, in similar cases, you would wish that he do unto you; and to Yourself, by such a prudent and well-regulated course of discipline as may best conduce to the preservation of your bodily and mental faculties in their fullest energy, thereby enabling you to exercise those talents with which God has blessed you, as well to His glory as to the welfare of your fellow creatures.

As a Citizen of the World, I would next enjoin you to be exemplary in the discharge of your civil duties, by never proposing, or at all countenancing, any act which may have a tendency to subvert the peace and good order of society, by paying due obedience to the laws of any State which may for a time become your place of residence, or afford you its protection and, above all, by never losing sight of the allegiance due to the Sovereign of your native land; ever remembering that the Almighty has implanted in your breast a sacred and indissoluble attachment towards that country whence you derived your birth and infant nurture.

As an Individual, I further recommend the practice of every domestic, as well as public virtue. Let Prudence direct you, Temperance chasten you, Fortitude support you, and Justice be the guide of all your actions. Be especially careful to maintain in their fullest splendour those truly Masonic ceremonies which have been so amply illustrated — namely, Benevolence and Charity.

Still, however, as a Freemason, there are other excellencies of character to which your attention may be particularly and forcibly directed. Amongst the foremost of these are Secrecy, Fidelity, and Obedience. Secrecy consists in an inviolate adherence to the obligation you have entered into, never improperly to disclose any of those Masonic secrets which have now, or may at any future time, be entrusted to your keeping, and cautiously to avoid all occasions which might inadvertently lead you to do so. Your Fidelity must be exemplified by a close conformity to the Constitutions of the fraternity, by adhering to the ancient Landmarks of the Order, by never attempting to extort or otherwise unduly obtain the secrets of a superior degree, and by refraining from recommending anyone to a participation of our secrets, unless you have strong grounds to believe that by a similar fidelity he will ultimately reflect honour on our choice.

So must your Obedience be proved by a strict observance of our Laws and Regulations; by a prompt attention to all signs and summonses; by a modest and correct demeanour while in the Lodge; by abstaining from every topic of religious or political discussion; by a ready acquiescence in all votes and resolutions duly passed by a majority of the Brethren, and by perfect submission to the will of the R.W.M. and his W...s While acting in the discharge of their respective offices. And, as a last general recommendation for your conduct, let me exhort you to dedicate yourself to such pursuits as may enable you to continue respectable in life, useful to mankind, and an ornament to the society of which this day you have become a member.

From the very commendable attention you appear to have given to this change, I am led to hope that you will duly appreciate the value of Freemasonry, and that there will be indelibly printed on your heart the sacred dictates of Truth, of Honour, and of Virtue.

R.W.M.— Now, Brother A.B., that concludes the ceremony of Initiation. We are empowered to confer the Second Degree upon you at any time after fourteen clear days. But before you can be passed to that higher Degree it is necessary that you should be examined in the work of an E.A. For the purpose of your instruction you are entitled to select any two Brethren as your instructors. As a rule, a Candidate leaves himself in the hands of his Proposer and Seconder, and if you follow this course, I have no doubt these Brethren will see that your are properly instructed.

CLOSING OF LODGE

R.W.M. gives one k..., and says Brethren, assist me to close the Lodge,

The Brethren rise and stand at the s... of f....

R.W.M. — W.J.W., what is the constant care of assembled M...s?

W.J.W. — To prove the L. close tyled.

R.W.M. — Direct that duty to be done.

W.J.W. — Br. I.G., prove the L. close tyled.

I.G. gives three k..., which are responded to by the T.

W.J.W. — R.W.M., the L. is close tyled.

R.W.M. — W.S.W., what is the next duty?

W.S.W. — To see that the Br. stand to order as E.A.M.s.

R.W.M. — To order, Br., as E.A.M.s. The Brethren give the s... of an E.A.M.

R.W.M. — W.S.W., your constant place in the Lodge?

W.S.W. — In the W., R.W.M.

R.W.M. — Why are you so placed?

W.S.W. — To mark the setting sun, to close the L. by your command, after having seen that every Br. has had his just and lawful due.

R.W.M. — Have all the wages been paid?

W.S.W. — So far as due and demanded.

R.W.M.— The labours of the day being ended, and the wages paid so far as due and demanded, I now command you to close this Ancient Masonic Lodge. W.S.W. — Br., in the name of the G... A... of the U..., and by command of the R.W.M., I declare this L. duly closed, and this I do by — (gives three k...)

W.J.W. — And it is closed accordingly. (gives three k...)

The I.G. gives three k..., which are responded to by the T., after which the R.W.M. gives three k....

R.W.M. — W.S.W., how should M...s meet?

W.S.W. — On the L., R.W.M.

W.J.W. — How should M...s act?

W.J.W. — On the P., R.W.M.

R.W.M. — And part, Brethren, on the S.; so let us meet, act, and part.

Chaplain — And may the blessing of the G... A... of the U... rest upon us, and all true and faithful Brethren throughout the world; may brotherly love prevail, and every moral and social virtue cement us.

Brethren — So mote it be,

R.W.M. — Br., nothing now remains but, in accordance with ancient custom, to lay aside our w... t...s, close the V.S.L., and lock up the secrets of our Order in the safe repository of our hearts, uniting in the act of fidelity, fidelity, fidelity. May God bless the King and the Craft. Unclothe and untyle.

FROM LABOUR TO REFRESHMENT

The R.W.M. rises in the E., gives one k... and addresses the W.J.W.

R.W.M. — W.J.W., What is the time?

W.J.W. — The sun is in the meridian.

R.W.M. — Then I command you to call the Brethren from labour to refreshment.

W.J.W. — Brethren, it is the R.W.M.’s command that you cease from labour and go to refreshment, taking care to keep within hail, so as to come on again in due time, that profit as well as pleasure may be the result.

The W.J.W. gives one k..., which is repeated by the W.S.W., the I.G. the T., and the R.W.M. The W.J.W. then raises his column, the W.S.W. lowers his, and the V.S.L. is closed.

FROM REFRESHMENT TO LABOUR.

The W.J.W. takes charge of the Lodge.

The R.W.M. gives one k... and the Brethren, stand to attention.

R.W.M. — W.J.W., what is the time?

W.J.W. — The sun has passed the zenith.

R.W.M. — Then I command you to call the Brethren from refreshment to labour.

W.J.W. — Brethren, it is the R.W.M.’s command that you cease from refreshment and return to labour.

The W.J.W, gives one k..., which is repeated by the W.S.W., the I.G., the T., and the R.W.M. Thereafter the W.J.W, lowers his column, the W.S.W. raises his, and the V.S.L. is re-opened.

THE SECOND DEGREE

THE OPENING OF THE LODGE

The Right Worshipful Master, having satisfied himself that the Office-Bearers are properly clothed and in their respective positions, rises in the E., gives o... k... with the m....

R.W.M. — Brethren, assist me to open this Lodge in the Second Degree.

All the Members stand at the s... of f....

R.W.M. — W.J.W., what is the first duty in a Lodge of F.C.M.s?

W.J.W. — To see that the Lodge is properly tyled, R.W.M.

R.W.M. — You will direct that duty to be done.

W.J.W. — Br. I.G., you will see that the Lodge is properly tyled.

The I.G. thereupon gives the k...s of the First Degree, which are responded to by the T.

I.G. — W.J.W., the Lodge is properly tyled.

W.J.W. — R.W.M., the Lodge is properly tyled.

R.W.M. — W.S.W., what is the next duty?

W.S.W. — To see that all present are F.C.M.s, that they are properly clothed, and stand to order as E.A.M.s, R.W.M.

R.W.M. — Are you satisfied that all present are F.C.M.s?

W.S.W. — I am, R.W.M.

R.W.M. — Then to order, Brethren, as E.A.M....s, and kindly remain so until further proved.

The Brethren give the sign of an E.A.M., which is returned by the R.W.M.

R.W.M. — W.J.W., are you a F.C.M.?

W.J.W. — I am, R.W.M.; try me and prove me.

R.W.M. — By what instrument in architecture will you be proved?

W.J.W. — By the S., R.W.M.

R.W.M. — What is a S...?

W.J.W. — An angle of 90 degrees, or the fourth part of a circle, R.W.M.

R.W.M. — Being yourself acquainted with the proper mode, you will prove the Br. to be F.C.M.s by s..., and thereafter demonstrate the proof to me by copying their example.

W.J.W. — Br., it is the R.W.M.’s command that you prove yourselves F.C.M.s by s....

The Brethren give the s... and stand to order as F.C.M.s.

W.J.W. — R.W.M., the Br. have proved themselves to be F.C.M.s by s..., and in obedience to your command I thus copy their example.

The W.J.W, gives the s..., which is returned by the R.W.M.

R.W.M. — I acknowledge the correctness of the s.... Br., the L. being thus constituted in the Second Degree, before I declare it open let us invoke the blessing of the G.G. of the U.

Chaplain — May the rays of Heaven shed their benign influence over us, to enlighten us in the paths of virtue and science.

Brethren — So mote it be.

R.W.M. — In the name of the G. G. of the U., and in virtue of my position as Master, I declare this L. duly opened on the S. for the instruction and improvement of F.C.M.s, and this I do by —

The R.W.M. gives the requisite k...s which are repeated by the W.S.W., the W.J.W. the I.G., and the T.

R.W.M. — And this, Brethren, shall be your s....

He gives the which is responded to by the Brethren.

R.W.M. — Be seated, Brethren.

The Brethren seat themselves, the W.J.W. lowers his column, the V.S.L. is opened at the proper place, and the c... and s... are placed in position.

CEREMONY OF PASSING

In the preparing room adjoining the Lodge the Candidate has his 1... a..., r... b..., and r... k... made b..., and the l... h... s...p-s...d. He is partially h... w.... He is then led to the d... of the Lodge, where his conductor, the J.D., who has supervised his preparations, gives the k... of the Degree.

I.G. — W.J.W., there is a report at the preparing-room door.

W.J.W. — R.W.M., there is a report at the preparing-room door.

R.W.M. — Brother S.D., you will attend to the report.

The S.D. gives the s... and retires, and interrogates the Conductor:—

S.D. — Who comes here?

J.D. — Mr A.B., who has been regularly initiated into Freemasonry, and has made such progress as he hopes will entitle him to be passed to the Second Degree.

S.D. — How does he hope to obtain that privilege?

J.D. — By the help of God, the assistance of the S..., and the benefit of a p... w... and g....

S.D. — Has he the p... w... and g...?

J.D.— He has not, but I will give them for him.

S.D. — Wait till I make a report to the R.W.M.

The S.D. returns to the Lodge, goes to the centre, and with his rod gives the k...s of the Degree.

R.W.M. — Who comes, who comes, who comes here?

S.D. — At the door of the Lodge stands Br. A.B., etc.

R.W.M. — How does he hope, etc.

S.D. — By the help of God, etc.

R.W.M. — We acknowledge the powerful aid by which he seeks it. Is he in possession of the p... w... and g...?

S.D. — He is not, but his Conductor has given them for him.

R.W.M. — Advance and give me that assurance for him.

The Conductor gives the p... w... and g....

The S.D. advances and gives the p... w... and g....

R.W.M. — The p... w... and g... are correct. Do you vouch that he comes properly prepared?

S.D. — I do, R.W.M.

R.W.M. — Then let him be admitted in due form. Take heed upon what he enters. Brethren, be upstanding to receive Br. A.B.

The Brethren stand at the s... of f...; Br. A.B. is brought within the Lodge, and the S.D., approaching him, says:

S.D.— Br. A.B., in the name of the G.G. of the U., and by command of the R.W.M., enter this L. of F.C.M.s on the angle of the S..., pressing your n... r... b..., which is to teach you to act upon the S... with all mankind, more particularly with Bro. Masons.

Br. A.B. is brought to the centre.

R.W.M. — Br. A.B. you will k... while the blessing of Heaven is invoked in aid of our proceedings. Brethren, let us pray.

The Candidate kneels on a cushion which has been placed for his convenience.

Chaplain — Almighty God, Thou G. G. of the U., we supplicate the continuance of Thine aid, on behalf of ourselves and of him who kneels before Thee. May the work begun in Thy name be continued to Thy glory, and evermore established in us, by obedience to Thy Divine precepts.

Brethren — So mote it be.

R.W.M. — Br. A.B., arise and follow your guide.

The J.D. conducts Br. A.B, to the W.J.W.’s pedestal and gives the k...s of the Degree.

W.J.W. — Who comes, who comes, who comes here?

The same questions and answers are given as at the door.

W.J.W. — You may safely pass to the W.

The J.D. conducts Bro. A.B. to the W.S.W.’s pedestal, where the same ceremony is gone through, after which the W.S.W. gives one k....

W.S.W. — R.W.M., I have here Bro. A.B. as a Can. properly prepared to be passed to the Second Degree.

R.W.M. — W.S.W., you will direct the J.D. to instruct the Can. to advance to the E. in due and ancient form in this Degree.

W.S.W. — Br. Deacon, it is the R.W.M.’s command that you conduct Br. A.B. twice round the inside of this warranted and worshipful Lodge to show to the Brethren that he is properly prepared to be passed to the Second Degree, and thereafter teach him to advance to the a... as you, yourself, were taught.

Preceded bv the S.B., who salutes the R.W.M. and Wardens as he passes them, the J.D. conducts Br. A.B. twice round the Lodge, and then brings him up towards the a.... Thereafter he addresses him thus:— Bro. A.B., the proper way to advance to the E. in this Degree is by two r... s.... You will first advance as an E.A. (Br. A.B. and the J.D. do this). Now, you will take another short p... with your r... f... and bring the h... of the l... into the h... of the r....

Br. A.B. and the J.D. do so, whereupon the J.D. says:

J.D. — R.W.M., I now present to you Br. A.B., duly and truly prepared to take the o... and o... of a F.C.M....

R.W.M. — Br. A.B., as the secrets of each Degree must be kept separate and distinct, another obligation is required of you. Are you willing to take it?

Br. A.B. — I am.

R.W.M. — Then you will k... upon your r... k... with your l... f... in the form of a s..., place your r... h... on the V.S.L., while your l... a... will be supported by this rod; then, as in the former Degree, you will repeat your name at length, and say after me:—

I, A.B., in the presence of the G.G, of the U., and in the body of this warranted and worshipful Lodge of Fellow-Craft Masons, regularly assembled and properly constituted, of my own free will and accord, do hereby, hereat, and hereon solemnly and sincerely promise, vow and swear, that I will always hele, conceal, and never reveal any or either of the secrets or mysteries of, or belonging to, the Second Degree of Freemasonry, usually denominated the F... C..., to him who is only an E.A., no more than I would any or either of them to the uninitiated of the outer world. I further pledge myself to act as a true and faithful Craftsman, acknowledge signs, obey summonses, and maintain the principles inculcated in the First Degree. To all these points I solemnly swear fidelity, without evasion, equivocation, or any mental reservation whatsoever, under the penalty of having, etc. So help me A. G., and keep me steadfast, in this the solemn obligation of a F.C.M....

R.W.M. — As a pledge of inviolable fidelity, you will seal this obligation on the V.S.L. K... the B... twice.

Bro. A.B. does so.

R.W.M. — Be seated, Brethren.

R.W.M. — Br. A.B., your progress in Freemasonry is now marked by the position of the S. and C. When you were made an E.A., both p... were hid; in this Degree one is disclosed, implying that you are now midway in F. — superior to an E.A. but inferior to that which, I trust, will be hereafter communicated to you. I now give you my hand, saying, rise, newly obligated F.C.M....

The R.W.M. raises Br. A.B. with the p... g....

R.W.M. — Having taken the solemn obligation of a F.C.M., I shall now proceed to entrust you with the s... of this Degree. You will first, however, advance to me as an E.A.; now take another p... with your r... f..., bringing the h... of the l... into the hollow of the r.... That is the second regular s... in Freemasonry, and it is in that position the s... of this Degree are communicated. They consist of a p... and p... w..., a s..., a g... or t..., and a w.... The p... g... is given thus —— . The p... w... is —— , and signies ——. It is usually depicted in the F.C.L. by an ear of corn near a stream of water. This word took its origin from an incident in Old Testament history.

Jepthah, judge of Israel, had long been troubled by the Ephraimites, a stubborn and rebellious people whom he had tried by lenient measures to subdue. The Ephraimites being highly incensed at not being called to fight and share in the rich spoils of the Ammonitish wars, assembled a mighty army and crossed the Jordan to give Jepthah battle. But Jepthah being apprised of their approach called together the men of Israel, gave them battle, and put them to flight; and to make his victory more complete. he ordered guards to be stationed at the different passes on the banks of the Jordan, and commanded, if the Ephraimites passed that way, they should pronounce the word —— ; but they being of a different tribe, pronounced it —— , which trifling defect proved them spies, and cost them their lives; and there fell that day, at the different passes on the banks of the Jordan, forty and two thousand. As the word was used then to distinguish friend from foe, it was later adopted by Masons as a proper pass-word to be given in the F.C. Degree, so as to secure that no unqualied person would ascend the winding staircase which led to the Middle Chamber of K... S...’s T.... The s... in this degree is threefold — the first part is given thus —— , and is called the s... of fidelity, emblematical of guarding the repository of your secrets from the enemies of Masonry; the second part is given —— , and is called the hailing s..., or s... of perseverance. This s... was made use of by M... while J... was fighting the A... in the valley of R... as we read that it was in this position that his arm was supported “with the rod of God in his hand,” and that “when M... held up his hand I... prevailed, and when he let down his hand A... prevailed;” the third part is called the penal s..., and as you will observe, refers to the penalty of your obligation, that you would rather have, etc. That is the sign with which you salute the Master on entering or retiring from a Lodge working in this Degree. The g... or t... is given thus —— . This g... also demands a w..., with which you are to observe the same strict caution as with the w... of the First Degree. The J.D. will now instruct you how to proceed.

R.W.M. — Bro. J.D., what is this?

J.D. — The p... g... of a F.C.M....

R.W.M. — What does it demand?

J.D. — It demands a p... w....

R.W.M. — Give me the p... w....

The J.D. gives the p... w... in full, whereupon the R.W.M. remarks that the p... w... can be given by l... or h... if a Mason desires, but that he is at liberty to give it in fu11.

The instruction then continues thus:

R.W.M. — Bro. J.D., what is this?

J.D. — The g... or t... of a F.C.M....

R.W.M. — What does it demand?

J.D. — It demands a w....

R.W.M. — Wil1 you give me the w...?

J.D. — I did not so receive it, neither can I so impart it.

R.W.M. — How will you dispose of it?

J.D. — I will l... or h... it with you.

R.W.M. — Will you give me a l...?

J.D. — No, you being my interrogator, you will please begin.

The w... is given, each giving a l... alternately.

R.W.M. — This w... is derived from the r... h... p... at the p... or e... to K... S...’s T..., so named after ——, the assistant H... P... who officiated at its dedication. The import of the w... is ——, and when conjoined with the w... of the First Degree, signifies ——— , for God said, “In strength will I establish this mine house, to stand firm for ever.”

R.W.M. — Bro. J.D., you will take Bro. A.B. to the Wardens for instruction.

The J.D. conducts Br. A.B. to the W.J.W.’s pedestal, and says, W.J.W., I present to you Bro. A.B. on his being passed to the Second Degree.

W.J.W. — Bro. A.B., you will advance to me as F.C.M....(Bro. A.B. takes the s...)

W.J.W. — Do you bring anything with you?

Bro. A.B. — A s....

W.J.W. — Will you give me the first p... of the s....

Bro. A.B. — I will (and he gives it).

W.J.W. — What p... of the s... is that?

Bro. A.B. — The s... of f....

W.J.W. — Emblematical of —— ?

Bro. A.B. — Of s... my s...s in the s... r... of the h....

W.J.W. — Will you give me the next part of the s...?

Bro. A.B. — I will (and he gives it).

W.J.W. — What p... of the s... is that?

Bro. A.B. — The s... of p...

W.J.W. — Will you complete the s...?

Bro. A.B. — I will (and he completes it).

W.J.W. — What p... of the s... is that?

Bro. A.B. — The p... p....

W.J.W. — What is the p...?

Bro. A.B. — That my l... b... be c... o..., etc.

W.J.W. — Have you anything else to communicate?

Br. A.B. — I have (gives the p... g...)

W.J.W. — What is this?

Bro. A.B. — The p... g... of a F.C.M....

W.J.W. — What does it demand?

Bro. A.B. — A p... w....

W.J.W. — Give me the p... w....

Bro. A.B. gives the p... w..., after which the W.J.W. says — Bro. J.D., you may safely pass to the W.

The J.D. conducts Bro. A.B. to the W.S.W.’s pedestal, and says, W.S.W., I present to you Bro. A.B. on his being passed to the Second Degree.

W.S.W. — Bro. A.B., you will advance to me as a F.C.M.... (Can. takes the s...)

W.S.W. — Do you bring anything with you?

Bro. A.B. — I do (gives the s...).

W.S.W. — What is that?

Bro. A.B. — The s... of a F.C.M....

W.S.W. — Have you anything to communicate?

Bro. A.B. — I have (gives the g...).

W.S.W. — What is this?

Bro. A.B. — The g... or t... of a F.C.M....

W.S.W. — What does it demand?

Bro. A.B. — A w....

W.S.W. — Will you give me the w...?

Bro. A.B. — I did not so receive it, neither can I so impart it.

W.S.W. — How will you dispose of it?

Bro. A.B. — I will l... or h... it with you.

W.S.W. — Will you give me a l...?

Bro. A.B. — You being my interrogator, you begin.

The w... is disposed of, after which the W.S.W. gives one k... and says — R.W.M., I present to you Bro. A.B., on his being passed to the Second Degree for some further mark of your favour.

R.W.M. — W.S.W., I delegate to you the duty of investing our Brother with the distinguishing badge of a F.C.M....

W.S.W. — Bro. A.B., by command of the R.W.M., I invest you with the distinguishing badge of a F.C.M., to mark the progress you have made in the science.

R.W.M. — Bro. A.B., the badge with which you have just been invested points out to you that as a F.C.M... you are expected to make the liberal arts and sciences your future study, so that you may be the better enabled to discharge your duties as a Mason, and estimate the wonderful works of the Almighty Creator. Br. Deacon, you will place our Brother in the S.E. part of the Lodge.

J.D. — Br. A.B., we are now about to proceed to the i... c... of K... S...’s T..., there to receive the w... and working tools of a F.C.M.... To get there we must, emblematically, ascend a w... s... consisting of t... f... and s... s.... Each of these flights has its own meaning in Masonry. Three rule a Lodge; Five hold a Lodge; and Seven or more make it perfect. The three that rule a Lodge are the R.W.M. and his W.’s; the five that hold a Lodge are the Master, W.’s and two F.C.’s. The seven that make it perfect are these five with two E.A.’s or other Masons added. Three rule a Lodge because there were but three Grand Masters at the building of the T..., and these were S... K... of I..., H... K... of T..., and H.A.B., the widow’s son sent by H... of T... to S... Five hold a Lodge in allusion to the five noble Orders of Architecture, which are T., I., C., D., and C. Seven or more make a perfect Lodge because S... was seven years and upwards engaged in building the temple. They also allude to the seven liberal arts and sciences, which are commended to every Mason, namely, G., R., L., A., G., M., and A.

The J.D. then instructs Br. A.B. as to the manner of reaching the S.E. corner, and conducts him to that part of the Lodge.

R.W.M. — Brother A.B., Freemasonry being a progressive science, when you were made an E.A. you were placed in the N.E. part of the L., to show that you were newly admitted. You are now placed in the S.E. part, to mark the progress you have made in the science. As in the former degree you were made acquainted with the principles of moral truth and virtue on which our system is based, so now you will be permitted to extend your researches into the more hidden mysteries of the Craft. In the name of the G.G. of the U., I present to you the working tools of a F.C.M., which are the Square, the Level, and the Plumb-rule. The Square is used by operative masons to try and adjust all rectangular corners of buildings, and to assist in bringing rude matter into due form; the Level is to lay levels and prove horizontals; and the Plumb-rule is to try, and adjust, all uprights, while fixing them on their proper bases. But as we are not Operative, but Free and Accepted or Speculative Masons, we apply these tools to our morals. In this sense the Square teaches us to regulate our actions by the Masonic rule and line, and to harmonise our conduct with the principles of morality and virtue, The level demonstrates that we are descended from the same stock, partakers of the same nature, and sharers of the same hope; and that although distinctions among men are necessary to preserve subordination and to reward merit and ability, no eminence of station should make us forget that we are all Brethren, for the time will come when all distinctions, save those of goodness and virtue, shall cease, and Death, the grand leveller of all human greatness, will reduce us to the same state. The Plumb-rule admonishes us to walk uprightly in our several stations, to hold the scales of justice with an equal poise, to observe the just medium between avarice and profusion, and to make our passions and prejudices coincide with the exact line of duty. In this sense the Square teaches morality,the Level equality, and the Plumb-rule justness and uprightness of life and actions. Thus, by square conduct, level steps, and upright actions, we hope to ascend to those Immortal Mansions, whence all goodness emanates.

CHARGE AFTER PASSING.

R.W.M. — Being passed to the Second Degree, we congratulate you on your preferment. The internal, not the external qualifications of a man are what Freemasonry regards. As you increase in knowledge you will improve in social intercourse. It is unnecessary for me to recapitulate the duties which as a Mason you are now bound to discharge, or to enlarge on the necessity of a strict adherence to them, as your own experience must have established their value. In your new character it is expected that you will not only conform to the principles of the Order, but steadily persevere in the practice of every commendable virtue. The study of the liberal arts — that valuable branch of education which tends so effectually to polish and adorn the mind — is earnestly recommended to your consideration, more especially the science of Geometry. Geometry or Masonry — originally synonymous terms — being of a Divine and moral nature, is enriched with the most useful knowledge, and while it proves the wonderful properties of nature, it demonstrates the more important truths of morality.

As the solemnity of our ceremonies requires a serious deportment, you are to be particularly attentive to your behaviour in our regular assemblies. You are to reserve our ancient usages and established customs sacred and inviolable, and induce others by your example to hold them in due veneration. Our laws and regulations you are strenuously to support and maintain, and be ever ready to assist in seeing them duly executed. You are not to palliate nor aggravate the offences of your Brethren, but in the decision of every trespass against our rules you are to judge with candour, admonish with friendship, and reprehend with justice.

Such is the nature of your engagements as a F.C.M., and to these duties you are now bound by the most solemn ties.

CLOSING OF LODGE.

R.W.M, gives one k..., and says, Brethren, assist me to close the Lodge.

The Brethren stand at the s... of f....

R.W.M. — W.J.W., what is the constant care in a L. of F.C.M.s?

W.J.W. — To prove the L. closed tyled.

R.W.M. — Direct that duty to be done.

W.J.W. — Bro. I.G. prove the L. close tyled.

The I.G. gives the k...s of the Degree, which are responded to by the T.

I.G. — W.J.W., the L. is close tyled.

W.J.W. — R.W.M., the L. is close tyled.

R.W.M. — W.S.W., what is the next duty?

W.S.W — To see that the Br. stand to order as F.C.M.s.

R.W.M. — To order Br. as F.C.M.s.

The Br. give the s... of a F.C.M....

R.W.M. — W.J.W., in this situation what have you discovered?

W.J.W. — The Sacred Symbol.

R.W.M. — W.S.W., where is it situated?

W.S.W. — In the centre of the building.

R.W.M. — W.J.W., to Whom does it allude?

W.J.W. — To G..., the G... G,.. of the U....

R.W.M. — Then let us remember that wherever we are, or whatever we do, He is always with us, and His all-seeing Eye beholds us; and while we continue to act according to the principles of the Craft, let us not fail to discharge our duty to Him with fervency and zeal.

Brethren — So mote it be.

R.W.M. — W.S W., what is your place in the Lodge?

W.S.W. — In the W., R.W.M.

R.W.M. — And your duty there?

W.S.W. — To mark the setting sun and to close the Lodge by your command, after seeing that every Brother has had his just and lawful due.

R.W.M. — Have all the wages been paid?

W.S.W. — So far as due and demanded, R.W.M.

R.W.M. — W.S.W., the labours of this Degree being ended, and the wages paid so far as due and demanded, I now command you to close the L.

W.S.W. — Br., in the name of the G... G... of the U..., and by command of the R.W.M., I declare this L. of F.C.M... duly closed, and this I do by — .(Gives the k...s of the Degree)

W.J.W. — And it is closed accordingly. (Gives the k...s of the Degree)

The I.G. gives the k...s, which are responded to by the T., after which the R.W.M. gives the k...s.

R.W.M. — W.S.W., how should M...s meet?

W.S.W. — On the L., R.W.M.

R.W.M. — W.J.W., how should M...s act?

W.J.W. — On the P., R.W.M.

R.W.M. — And part, Brethren, on the S.; so let us meet, act, and part.

Chaplain — And may the blessing of the G... G... of the U... rest upon us, and upon all true and faithful Brethren throughout the world; may brotherly love prevail, and every moral and social good cement us.

Brethren — So mote it be.

R.W.M. — Br., nothing now remains but, in accordance with our ancient custom, to lay aside our w... t...s, close the V.S.L., and lock up the secrets of our Order in the safe repository of our hearts uniting in the act of fidelity, fidelity, fidelity. May God bless the King and the Craft. Unclothe and untyle.

SHORT METHOD OF RAISING THE LODGE TO SECOND DEGREE.

The R.W.M. rises in the E., gives one k..., at which the Brethren stand at the s... of f....

R.W.M. — W.J.W., will you be off or from?

W.J.W. — From, R.W.M.

R.W.M. — From what?

W.J.W. — From the Degree of E.A. to that of F.C.

R.W.M. — Brethren, by virtue of my office, I hereby declare the Lodge raised from the Degree of E.A. to that of F.C., and this I do by ——.

The R.W.M. gives the k...s of the Second Degree, which are repeated by Wardens, I.G., and Tyler.

R.W.M. — And this shall be your s....

He gives the s... which is responded to by the Brethren.

R.W.M. — Be seated, Brethren.

The Brethren seat themselves, the V.S.L. is opened at the proper place, and the c... and s... are placed in position.

SHORT METHOD OF REDUCING.

The R.W.M. rises in the E., gives one k... and the Brethren stand at the s... of f....

R.W.M. — W.J.W., will you be off or from?

W.J.W. — Off, R.W.M.

R.W.M. — Off what?

W.J.W. — Off the Degree of F.C. to that of E.A.

R.W.M. — Brethren, by virtue of my office, I hereby declare the Lodge reduced from the Degree of F.C. to that of E.A., and this I do by —.

The R.W.M. gives the k...s of the First Degree, which are repeated by Wardens, I.G., and T.

R.W.M. — And this, Brethren, shall be your s....

He gives the s... of an E.A., which is responded to by the Brethren.

R.W.M. — Be seated, Brethren.

The Brethren seat themselves, the V.S.L. is opened at the proper place, and c... and s... are placed in position.

THE THIRD DEGREE

THE OPENING OF THE LODGE

The R.W.M. rises in the E., and gives one k....

R.W.M. — Brethren, assist me to open this Lodge in the Third Degree.

The Brethren stand at the s... of f...

R.W.M. — W.J.W., what is the first duty in a Lodge of M.M.s?

W.J.W. — To see the Lodge properly tyled, R.W.M.

R.W.M. — You will direct that duty to be done.

W.J.W. — Br. I.G., see the Lodge properly tyled.

The I.G. gives the k...s of the Second Degree, which are answered by the T.

I.G. — W.J.W., the Lodge is tyled.

W.J.W. — R.W.M., the Lodge is tyled.

R.W.M. — W.S.W, what is the next duty?

W.S.W. — To see that all present are M.M.s, that they are properly clothed and stand to order as F.C.M.s.

R.W.M. — W.S.W., are you satisfied that all present are M.M....s?

W.S.W. — I am, R.W.M.

R.W.M. — Then, to order, Brethren, as F.C.M.s, and kindly remain so until further proved.

The brethren stand to order as F.C.M.s giving the appropriate s..., which is returned by the R.W.M.

R.W.M. — W.J.W., are you a Master Mason?

W.J.W. — I am, R.W.M.; try me and prove me.

R.W.M. — By what instruments in architecture will you be proved?

W.J.W. — The S... and C..., R.W.M.

R.W.M. — Being yourself acquainted with the proper mode, you will prove the Brethren to be M.M.s by s..., and thereafter demonstrate the proof to me by copying their example.

W.J.W. — Brethren, it is the R.W.M.’s command that you prove yourselves M.M.s by s...

The Brethren give the s... and stand to order as M.M.s.

W.J.W. — R.W.M., the Brethren have proved themselves M.M.s by s..., and in obedience to your command I thus copy their example.

The W.J.W. gives the s..., which is returned by the R.W.M.

R.W.M. — I acknowledge the correctness of the s.... W.J.W., whence come you?

W.J.W. — The E., R.W.M.

R.W.M. — W.S.W., whither are you directing your course?

W.S.W. — The W., R.W.M.

R.W.M. — W.J.W., why do you leave the E. and go to the W.?

W.J.W. — In search of that which is lost, which, by your instructions and our own endeavours, we hope to find.

R.W.M. — W.S.W., what is that which is lost?

W.S.W. — The genuine s... of a M.M.

R.W.M. — W.J.W., how came they to be lost?

W.J.W. — By the untimely d... of our Master H.A.B.

R.W.M. — W.S.W., where do you hope to find them?

W.S.W. — On the Centre.

R.W.M. — W.J.W., what is a Centre?

W.J.W. — A point within a circle from which all parts of the circumference are equidistant.

R.W.M. — W.S.W., why do you expect to find them on the Centre?

W.S.W. — Because that is a point from which no M.M. can err.

R.W.M. — Then we will assist you in your search.

Chaplain — May Heaven aid our united endeavours.

Brethren — So mote it be.

R.W.M. — Brethren, in the name of the M.H., and in virtue of my position as Master, I declare this Lodge duly opened on the Centre, for the instruction and improvement of M.M.s, and this I do by —

The R.W.M. gives the requisite number of k...s, which are repeated by the W.S.W., the W.J.W., the I.G., and the T.

R.W.M. — And this, Brethren, shall be your s....

He gives the s..., which is responded to by the Brethren, after which all exclaim a... g... t... t... M... H..., etc.

R.W.M. — Be seated, Brethren.

The Brethren seat themselves, the V.S.L. is opened at the proper place, and the c... and s... are placed in position.

THE CEREMONY OF RAISING.

In the preparing room adjoining the Lodge the J.D. attends to Br. A.B., and sees that he has his a...s b... and k...s b..., and h...s s...p-s...d. The J.D., as Conductor, then leads him to the d... of the Lodge, and gives the k...s of the Degree.

I.G. — W.J.W., there is a report at the preparing-room door.

W.J.W. — R.W.M., there is a report at the preparing-room door.

R.W.M. — S.D., you will attend to the report.

The S.D. gives the s... and retires, and interrogates the Conductor.

S.D. — Who comes, who comes, who comes here?

Con. — Br. A.B., who has been regularly initiated into Freemasonry, passed to the Second Degree, and has made such progress as he hopes will entitle him to be raised to the high and sublime Degree of M.M.

S.D. — How does he hope to obtain that privilege?

Con. — By the help of God, the assistance of the S... and C..., and the benefit of a p... w... and g....

S.D. — Has he the p... w... and g...?

Con. — He has not, but I will give them for him.

The Conductor gives the p... w... and g....

S.D. — Wait till I make a report to the R.W.M.

The S.D. returns to the Lodge, goes to the centre, and with his rod gives the k...s of the Degree.

R.W.M. — Who comes, who comes, who comes here?

S.D. — R.W.M., at the door of the L. stands Br. A.B., etc.

R.W.M. — How does he hope, etc.?

S.D. — By the help of God, etc.

R.W.M. — We acknowledge the powerful aid by which he seeks it. Is he in possession of the p... w... and g...?

S.D. — He is not, but his conductor has given them for him.

R.W.M. — Advance and give me that assurance.

The S.D. advances and gives the p... w... and g....

R.W.M. — The p... w... and g... are correct. Do you vouch that he comes properly prepared?

S.D. — I do, R.W.M.

R.W.M. — Then let him be admitted in due form. Take heed upon what he enters. Brethren, be upstanding to receive Bro. A.B.

The Brethren stand at the s... of f...; Bro. A.B. is brought within the Lodge, and the S.D. approaches him.

S.D.— Bro. A.B., in the name of the M... H..., and by command of the R.W.M., enter this L. of M.M.s on the p... of the C..., pressing your n... r... and l... b..., which is to teach you that, as the most vital parts of man are contained within the b..., so are the most valuable tenets of Freemasonry comprehended between the points of the C..., which are Virtue, Morality, and Brotherly Love.

Br. A.B. is brought to the centre.

R.W.M. — Br. A.B., you will k... while the blessing of Heaven is invoked in aid of our proceedings. Brethren, let us pray.

The candidate kneels on a cushion which has been placed for his convenience.

Chaplain — Almighty and Eternal God, Architect and Ruler of the Universe, at Whose creative fiat all things first were made, we, the frail creatures of Thy providence, humbly implore Thee to pour down on this convocation assembled in Thy holy Name, the continual dew of Thy blessing. More especially we beseech Thee to impart Thy grace to this Thy servant who seeks to partake with us the mysterious s... of a M.M. Endow him with such fortitude that in the hour of trial he fail not, but, passing safely under Thy protection through the valley of the shadow of death, he may finally arise from the tomb of transgression to shine as the stars for ever and ever.

Brethren — So mote it be.

R.W.M. — Br. A.B., rise and follow your guide.

The J.D. conducts Br. A.B. to the W.J.W.’s pedestal and gives the k...s of the Degree.

W.J.W. — Who comes, who comes, who comes here?

The same questions and answers are given as at the door.

W.J.W. — You may safely pass to the W.

The J.D. conducts Bro. A.B. to the W.S.W.’s pedestal where the same ceremony is gone through, after which the W.S.W. gives one k....

W.S.W. — R.W.M., I have here Br. A.B. as a Can. properly prepared to be raised to the high and sublime Degree of a M.M.

R.W.M. — W.S.W., you will direct the D... to instruct the Can. to advance to the E. in due and ancient form in this degree.

W.S.W. — Br. Deacon, it is the R.W.M.’s command that you conduct Br. A.B. three times round the inside of this warranted and worshipful Lodge to show to the Brethren that he is properlv prepared to be raised to the high and sublime degree of a M.M., and thereafter teach him to advance to the a... as you yourself were taught.

Preceded by the S.B., who salutes the R.W.M. and Wardens as he passes them, the J.D. conducts Br. A.B. three times round the Lodge, and then brings him up towards the a....

J.D. — Br. A.B., the proper way to advance to the E. in this Degree is by three r... s.... You will first advance as an E.A. (Br. A.B. and the J.D. do this); now as a F.C.M. (Br. A.B. and the J.D, do this) Now you will take another s... p... with your l... f... and bring both h...s together. (Br. A.B. and the J.D. do so)

J.D. — R.W.M., I now present to you Br. A.B., duly and truly prepared to take the o... and o... of a M.M.

R.W.M. — Br. A.B., it is only fair to inform you that a most serious and solemn obligation, as well as a greater trial of your fortitude and fidelity, now await you. Are you prepared to meet them as you ought?

Br. A.B. — I am.

R.W.M. — Then you will k... on both k... place b... h... on the V.S.L., then, as in the former degrees, repeat your name at length, and say after me:—

I, A.B., in the presence of the M... H..., and in the body of this worthy and worshipful Lodge of M.M.s, regularly assembled and properly constituted, of my own free will and accord, do hereby, hereat, and hereon, sincerely promise and solemnly swear that I will always hele, conceal, and never reveal, any or either of the secrets or mysteries of, or belonging to, the Third Degree, to any one of an inferior Degree, or to anyone in the world, except it be to him or them to whom the same may justly and lawfully belong, and not even to him or them until after due trial, strict examination, or a full conviction that he or they are worthy of that confidence, or in the body of a M.M.s Lodge duly opened on the Centre. I further solemnly engage myself to adhere to the principles of the Square and Compasses, to answer and obey all lawful signs and summonses sent to me from a M.M.’s Lodge, if within the length of my cable-tow, and to plead no excuse thereto but that of sickness, or the pressing emergency of my own public or private avocations. I further solemnly pledge myself to maintain and uphold the five points of Fellowship in act as well as in word:— that my h... given to a M.M., shall be a sure pledge of brotherhood; that my f... shall travel through dangers and difficulties to unite with his in forming a column of mutual defence and support; that the posture of my daily supplications shall remind me of a Brother’s wants, and dispose my heart to succour his weakness and relieve his distress as far as I can do so without injury to myself or family; that my b... shall be the sacred repository of his when entrusted to my care — murder, treason, felony, and all other offences contrary to the laws of God and the ordinances of the realm being at all times specially excepted; and finally, that I will maintain a M.M.’s honour, and carefully preserve it as my own; that I will not injure him myself, nor knowingly suffer that to be done by others, if in my power to prevent it, but, on the contrary, will boldly repel the slanderer of his good name, and most strictly respect the chastity of those nearest and dearest to him, in the persons of his wife, his sister, his mother, and his child. I further solemnly promise that I will not use the hailing s... of this Degree except it be for the preservation of my own life or the lives of those depending upon me; but should I see that s... given or hear the words which accompany it spoken, I will hasten to the assistance of those so giving the s..., or using the w...s, should I see a greater chance of saving life than of losing my own. These several points I solemnly swear to observe without evasion, equivocation, or any mental reservation whatsoever, under the penalty of having, etc.

R.W.M. — As a pledge of your fidelity, and to render this solemn obligation binding for so long as you shall live, I call on you to salute the V.S.L. thrice.

Br. A.B. does so.

R.W.M. — Be seated, Brethren.

R.W.M. — Br. A.B., let me once more direct your attention to the position of the S ...and C.... When you were made an E.A. both points were hid; in the Second Degree one was disclosed, indicating that you were midway in Freemasonry; in this, both are exhibited, implying that you are now at liberty to work with both these points to render the circle of your Masonic duties complete. I now give you my hand, saying, rise, newly obligated M. among M...s.

The R.W.M. raises Br. A.B. with the p... g....

R.W.M. — Br. A.B., having taken the great and solemn obligation of a M.M., you have now a right to demand of me that last and greatest trial, bv which alone you can be admitted to a participation in the secrets of the Third Degree; but it is first my duty to call your attention to a retrospect of those Degrees through which you have passed, by which you will be the better enabled to distinguish and appreciate the connection of our whole system, and the relative dependency of its several parts. Your admission among Masons in a state of helpless indigence was an emblematical representation of the entrance of all men on this their mortal existence. It inculcated the useful lessons of natural equality, and mutual dependence — it instructed you in the active principles of universal beneficence and charity, and taught you to seek the solace of your own distress by extending relief and consolation to your fellow-creatures in the hour of their affliction — but above all it taught you to bend with humility and resignation to the will of the G... A... of the U..., and to dedicate your heart, thus purified from every baneful and malignant passion, and fitted only for the reception of truth and wisdom, as well to His Glory as to the welfare of your fellow creatures.

Proceeding onwards, and still guiding your steps by the principles of moral truth, you were led into the Second Degree there to contemplate the intellectual faculties, and trace them from their development through the paths of heavenly science, even to the throne of God Himself.

To your mind, thus modelled by virtue and science, nature, however, presents one great and useful lesson more — she prepares you, by contemplation, for the closing hour of your existence; and when, by means of that contemplation, she has conducted you through the intricate windings of this mortal state, she finally instructs you how to die. Such, Br. A.B., is the peculiar lesson of the Third Degree in Masonry, the chief object of which is to teach the heart to seek for happiness in the consciousness of a life well spent, so that, when the shadows gather around, an unseen arm may sustain the sinking head, and Death create not a captive but a conqueror; it invites you to reflect on this awful subject, and teaches you to feel that to the just and virtuous man Death has no terrors equal to the stain of falsehood and dishonour. Of this great truth the annals of Freemasonry afford us a glorious example in the unshaken fidelity and noble death of our Master H... A... B..., who was slain just at the completion of K... S...’s T..., at the construction of which he was the principal architect. Hitherto, so far as Freemasonry is concerned, you have heard little of this eminent personage, He was, as we gather from Holy Writ, the son of a widow of Tyre, and when King Solomon applied to the King of Tyre to assist him in raising a Temple to the Most High, that friendly monarch despatched H.A.B. to Jerusalem, H.A.B. was possessed of great skill and much of the magnificence of the Temple was due to his wonderful ability. He laboured untiringly in the service of Solomon but was not permitted to see the completion of the Work for, according to Masonic tradition, the manner of his death was as follows:— Fifteen F.C...s of that superior class of workmen who were appointed to preside over the rest, seeing that the Temple was nearly finished, and that they were not in possession of the secrets of the Third Degree, conspired together to obtain them by any means, even to have recourse to violence. On the eve of carrying their scheme into execution, twelve of them recanted, but the others, being of a more determined and atrocious character than the rest, persisted in their impious design, in the prosecution of which they placed themselves respectively at the E., W., and S. entrances to the Temple, whither our Master had retired to offer up his prayers to the M... H..., as was his wonted custom at the hour of High Twelve. His devotions being ended, he attempted to return by the S. door, where he was accosted by the first of these ruffians, who, for want of other weapon, had armed himself with a heavy plumb-rule, and in a threatening manner demanded of him the secrets of a M.M., warning him that death would be the consequence of a refusal. Our Master H..., true to his obligation, answered that these secrets were known only to three in the world, and that without the consent of the two others he neither could nor would divulge them, but intimated that he had no doubt diligence and patience would in due time entitle the worthy F.C. to a participation in them, but, as for himself, he would rather suffer death than betray the sacred trust reposed in him. This answer not proving satisfactory, the ruffian aimed a blow at the head of our Master H..., but, being startled at the firmness of his demeanour, he missed his forehead, but the weapon glanced with such force on his r... t... as to cause him to sink on the l... k..., the position in which you were placed when taking the O... of an E.A. Recovering from this shock, he made for the W. door where he was opposed by the second rufiian, to whom he answered as in the former instance, but with undiminished firmness, when the villain who was armed with a level, struck him a violent blow on the l... t..., which caused him to sink upon his r... k..., the position in which you were placed when taking the O... of a F.C. Our Master now finding all chance of escape cut off at both these quarters, staggered faint and bleeding to the E. door, where the third ruffian was posted, who received a similar reply to his insolent demand (for even at that trying moment our Master remained firm and unshaken), when the ruffian, who was armed with a heavy setting-maul, struck him a violent blow on the f... h..., which laid him l... at his f....

Br A.B., we have now come to that part of the ceremony where it is necessary for you to retire and be prepared, so that you may return to the Lodge and personify one of the brightest characters in the annals of Freemasonry. You will now retire without giving any s..., and by taking three p...s backwards.

Br. A.B. is conducted to the preparing-room where he is h... w.... All l...s in the Lodge are extinguished with the exception of the Star in the E.. The emblems of mortality are properly set out. Bro. A.B. is then brought within the Lodge, when t... s... are s... on a g.... Thereafter the attack upon H.A.B. is enacted. When this has been done the R.W.M. says:

R.W.M. — W.S.W., why do the Brethren look so sad?

W.S.W. — The M. has gone amissing, R.W.M.

R.W.M. — That recalls to my mind the fact that a conspiracy concerning the M... was reported to me. W.J.W., you will retire by the S. g... and see whether, etc.

W.J.W. — Accompany me, Brethren, on the s... of an E.A.

Solemn music is played, and the Brethren perambulate on the s... of an E.A., after which the W.J.W. reports.

R.W.M. — W.S.W., you will retire by the W., etc.

W.S.W. — Accompany me, Brethren, on the s... of a F.C.

The Brethren perambulate on the s... of a F.C., after which the W.S.W, reports.

R.W.M. — W.S.M., you will retire by the E., etc.

W.S.M. — Accompany me, Brethren, on the s... of a M.M.

The Brethren perambulate on the s... of a M.M., after which the W.S.M. reports.

R.W.M. — W.S.M., you will conduct us to the spot.

W.S.M. — Return with me, Brethren, on the s... of a M.M.

The Brethren again perambulate on the s... of a M.M.

R.W.M. — If this be the g... of the m... m..., it will be d... due E. and W., and will be s... l... and p.... W.J.W., you will apply the j... of your office.

The W.J.W. does so and reports — It is p..., R.W.M.

R.W.M. — W.S.W., you will apply the j... of your office.

The W.S.W. does so, and reports — It is s... R.W.M.

R.W.M. — W.S.M., what is the j... of your office?

W.S.M. — The S..., R.W.M.

R.W.M. — To whom does it belong?

W.S.M. — To the c... in general and the m... in particular, R.W.M.

R.W.M. — Then you will apply the j... of your office. The W.S.M. does so.

W.S.M. — It is S..., R.W.M,

R.W.M. — It is s... l... and p...; and from observations I have already taken it is d... due E. and W. Remove the t... and see what remains.

The Brethren do so and then exclaim, alas, etc.

R.W.M. — W.J.W., you will endeavour to r... the r... of our Master H.A.B. by the E.A. g.... (The W.J.W. does so)

W.J.W. — It proves a slip, R.W.M.

R.W.M. — W.S.W., you will endeavour, etc., by the F.C. g.... (The W.S.W. does so)

W.S.W. — It proves a slip, R.W.M.

R.W.M. — Then, W.S.W., what is our duty?

W.S.W. — To pray, R.W.M.

R.W.M. — Then, Br. Chaplain, you will lead us in prayer.

Chaplain — Thou, O God, who knowest our down-sittings and uprisings, and understandest our thoughts from afar off, shield and defend us from the evil intentions of our enemies, and support us under the trials we are destined to endure while passing through this vale of tears. Man that is born of a woman is of few days and full of trouble. He cometh forth like a flower and is cut down: he fleeth also as a shadow and continueth not. Seeing his days are determined, the number of his months are with Thee, Thou hast appointed his bounds that he cannot pass; turn from him, O Lord, that he may rest till he shall accomplish his days. For there is hope of a tree, if it be cut down, that it will sprout again, and that the tender branch thereof will not cease; but man dieth and wasteth away: yea, man giveth up the ghost and where is he? As the waters fail from the sea, and the flood decayeth and drieth up, so man lieth down, and riseth not till the heavens be no more. Yea, O God, have compassion on the children of Thy creation, and com- fort them in their hour of trouble. It is true that we stand round the g... of all that is mortal of one who was dearly beloved by us all, and we mourn; yet not as they who have no hope, for we look forward to a bright resurrection, to a glorious immortality, and a happy reunion on the shores of eternity, where the wicked cease from troubling, and the weary are at rest. Now rest in sweet repose, our beloved Brother! D... the grim T... of Eternity hath indeed ushered thee within the vale but, on another morn, when the G... S... shall descend, and the heavens shall be opened, and the g... o... w... be spoken, thou shalt arise to shine as the stars for ever and ever. We shall go unto thee, but thou shalt return unto us no more. Green be the grass that waves o’er thy t..., light be the ashes that cover thy r..., and may the glorious S... of R... shine brightly on the morn of thy awakening.

Brethren — So mote it be.

R.W.M. — W.W...s, having both failed in your attempts, there yet remains a peculiar method, which is to take our Br. by the lion’s g..., or the strong g... of a M.M., and r... him on the f... p... of f..., of which, with your assistance, I will make a trial.

Br. A.B. is then r... on the f... p... of f....

R.W.M. — It is thus, Br. A.B., that all M.M.s are r... from a f... d... to a reunion with the companions of their former toils.

The R.W.M., points to the S... in the E.

R.W.M.— Let me now beg of you to observe that the light of a M.M. is but darkness visible, serving only to discover that gloom which rests on the very prospect of futurity. It is that mysterious veil of darkness which the eye of human reason cannot penetrate, unless assisted by the light which is from above; yet even by this glimmering ray you may perceive that you stand on the very brink of the g..., which, when this transitory life shall have passed away, will again receive you into its cold bosom.

At this point the attention of Br. A.B. is directed to the c..., s..., and c...s-b...s, etc., which have hitherto been hidden from his gaze.

R.W.M.— Let the emblems of mortality which lie before you lead you to contemplate gour inevitable destiny, and guide your reflections into that most interesting of all human studies, the knowledge of yourself. Be careful to perform your allotted task while it is day, for the night cometh when no man can work. Continue to listen to the voice of nature, which bears witness that even in this perishable frame resides a vital and immortal principle, which inspires a holy confidence that the Lord of Life will enable us to trample the king of terrors beneath our feet, and lift our eyes to that bright Morning Star whose rising brings peace and salvation to the faithful and obedient of the human race.

The l...s are now restored, and the Brethren who have been assisting in the ceremonial resume their seats, while Br. A.B. is conducted to the centre.

R.W.M. — Br. A.B., I cannot better reward your attention than by immediately entrusting you with the s... of this Degree. You will, therefore, advance to me as an E.A.; now as a F.C. You will now take another short p.. with your l... f... as before, and bring b... h...s together. That is the third regular s... in Freemasonry, and it is in this position the s... of this Degree are communicated. They consist of s..., t..., and w.... Of the s... the first and second are casual. The first casual s... is formed from the F.C., and is called the s... of h..., and is given thus — . The second casual s... is the s... of s..., and is given thus — . The third is the s... of g... or d..., and is given thus — . The fourth, or p... s..., because it alludes to the penalty of your obligation, is given thus — , and implies that, as a man of honour and a M.M., you would rather be, etc., tha11 improperly divulge the s... of this Degree. This is the s... with which you salute the Master on entering or retiring from a Lodge working in this Degree. The fifth is the g... or r... s..., and is given thus — . It took its rise at the time the Temple was finished. When S... and the Princes of his household went to view it, they were so struck with its magnificence, that with one simultaneous impulse they raised their h... thus, and exclaimed — . Of these s...s the first and second will be explained to you in the course of a lecture which is to follow. The third is believed to have taken its origin from the act of our M. — H.A.B, who, when passing from the to the gate, raised his hand, and sought to wipe the b... and p... from his forehead. There is still another s.... It is the hailing s... of the Degree, to which reference was made in your O... It is given thus — The g... or t... is the first of the five p... of f.... The five p... of f... are : — h... to h..., I greet you as a Brother; f... to f... that my f... shall travel through difficulties and dangers to unite with yours in forming a column of mutual defence and support; k... to k..., that the posture of my daily supplication shall remind me of my brother’s wants and incline my heart to succour his distress; b... to b..., that my b... shall be the sacred repository of all his lawful s... when entrusted tome as such; and h... over b..., that I shall maintain a Master Mason’s honour as my own in his absence as I would if he were present. It is in this position and this position alone and even then only in a whisper that the w... is given. It is M... or M..., both words signifying the M... is s..., or the M... is slain.

R.W.M. — W.S.W., I delegate to you the duty of investing Br. A.B. with the distinguishing badge of a M.M.

W.S.W. — By the R.W.M.’s command I invest you with the distinguishing badge of a M.M., to mark the further progress you have made in the science.

R.W.M. — I would add to what has been stated by the W.S.W. that the badge with which you have been invested not only points out your rank as a M.M., but is likewise meant to remind you of those great duties you have just solemnly engaged to perform, and, while it marks your own superiority it calls on, you to afford assistance and instruction to the Brethren in the inferior Degrees,

R.W.M. — I now present to you the working tools of a Master Mason, which are the Skirrit, the Pencil and the Compasses. The Skirrit is an instrument which acts on a centre pin, whence a line is drawn, chalked, and struck, to mark out the ground for the foundation of the intended structure. With the Pencil the skilful artist delineates the building on a draft or plan for the instruction and guidance of the workmen. The Compasses enable him with accuracy and precision to ascertain and determine the limits and proportions of its several parts. But as we are not Operative, but Free and Accepted Masons, we apply these tools to our morals. In this sense the Skirrit points out to us that straight and undeviating line of conduct laid down for our pursuit in the V.S.L. The Pencil teaches us that our words and actions are observed and recorded by the Almighty Architect, to whom we must give an account of our conduct through life. By the Compasses we are reminded of His unerring and impartial justice, which, having defined for our instruction the limits of good and evil, will finally reward or punish us according as we have obeyed or disregarded His Divine commands. Thus, the working tools of a M.M. teach us to have in mind and to act according to the laws of the Divine Creator, so that, when we shall be summoned from this sublunary abode, we may ascend to the Grand Lodge, where the World’s Great Architect lives and reigns for ever.

At this point it is customary in some Lodges to allow the Brother to retire to be r... to his p... c... after which, on his return, the second part of the traditional history of the Degree is recited. In other Lodges no interruption is permitted.

R.W.M. — We left off at that part of our traditional history, which mentioned the death of our Master H.A.B. A loss so important as that of the principal Architect could not fail of being speedily and severely felt. The want of those plans and designs which had hitherto been so regularly supplied throughout every department of the work, was the first indication that some heavy calamity had befallen him. The Overseers deputed some of the most distinguished of their Brethren to acquaint K... S... of the utter confusion into which the absence of had plunged them, and at the same time to express their apprehension that to some fatal catastrophe must be attributed his sudden and mysterious disappearance, King S... immediately ordered a general muster of the workmen throughout the various departments, when three of the same class were not to be found, and on the same day the twelve who had originally joined in the conspiracy, went before the King and made a voluntary confession of all they knew up to the time of their having withdrawn themselves from the number of the conspirators. His fears being awakened for the safety of his chief artist, he selected fifteen trusty F.C...s, and ordered them to go and make diligent search after the person of their Master H., to see if he were yet alive, or had suffered death in the attempt to extort from him the s... of his exalted degree. Accordingly, a stated day having been appointed for their return to Jerusalem, thev formed themselves into three F.C. Lodges, and departed from the three entrances of the Temple.

Many days were spent in fruitless search; indeed, one Lodge returned to Jerusalem without having effected any discovery of importance. The second was more fortunate; for on the evening of a certain day, after having suffered the greatest privations and fatigue, one of the Brethren, who had rested himself in a reclining posture, in order to assist his rising, caught hold of a shrub that grew near, which to his surprise came easily out of the ground. On a closer examination he found that the earth had been recently disturbed. He therefore hailed his Brethren, and, with their united efforts, succeeded in reopening it, and there found the body of the Master very indecently interred. They covered it again with all respect and reverence, and in order to distinguish the spot, stuck a sprig of Acacia at the head of the grave. They then hastened to Jerusalem to impart the afflicting intelligence to K... S..., who, when the first emotions of grief had subsided, ordered them to return and raise the body of their Master H. to such a sepulchre as became his rank and exalted talents, at the same time informing them that by his untimely death the genuine s... of a M.M. were lost. He charged them, therefore, to be particularly careful in observing whatever casual s..., t..., or w... might occur among them while paying their last sad office of respect to departed merit. They performed their task with the utmost fidelity, for on the moment of re-opening the ground, one of the Brethren, looking round, saw some of his companions in this situation —— , expressive of their h... at the afilicting sight, and others viewing the ghastly wound still visible on his f..., smote their own thus — , in sympathy with his sufferings. Two of the Brethren then descended into the g..., one of whom endeavoured to r... the body by the E.A. g..., which proved a slip; the other tried the F.C. g..., which proved a slip also. Having both failed in their attempts, a more zealous and expert Brother descended, and with their assistance, r... him on the five p... of f..., while others, still more animated, exclaimed, — , which signifies —— . K... S... ordered that these casual s..., t..., and w... should designate all M.M.s throughout the Universe, until time or circumstances should restore the genuine ones.

It only remains for me to state that the third Lodge of Craftsmen had pursued their researches in the direction of Joppa, and were meditating their return to Jerusalem, when, passing the mouth of a cavern, they heard sounds of deep lamentation and regret, and on entering to satisfy themselves of the cause, they found three men answering the description of those for whom they were in search. On being charged as the perpetrators of the m..., and finding all chance of escape cut off, they confessed their guilt, and were bound and led to Jerusalem, where K... S... sentenced them to that death which the heinousness of their crime so justly merited.

CHARGE AFTER RAISING

R.W.M. — Br. A.B., your zeal for the institution of Freemasonry, the progress which you have made in the art, and your conformity to the general regulations, have pointed you out as a proper object of our favour and esteem.

In the character of a M.M., you are henceforth authorised to correct the errors and irregularities of Brethren and Fellows, and guard them against a breach of fidelity. To improve the morals and correct the manners of men in society must be your constant care. With this object in view, you are to recommend to inferiors, obedience and submission; to equals, courtesy and affability; to superiors, kindness and condescension. Universal benevolence you are always to inculcate; and by the regularity of your own behaviour afford the best example for the conduct of others. The ancient landmarks of our Order, which are here entrusted to your care, you are to preserve sacred and inviolable, and never suffer any infringement of our rites, or a deviation from established usage and custom.

Duty, honour, and gratitude now bind you to be faithful to every trust, to support with becoming dignity your new character, and to enforce by example and precept, the tenets of our system. Let no motive, therefore, make you swerve from your duty, violate your vows, or betray your trust; but be true and faithful, and imitate the example of that celebrated Artist whom you have this evening represented. By such exemplary conduct you will convince the world that merit has been your title to our privileges, and that on you our favours have not been undeservedly bestowed.

It is usual when a Brother has been raised to the High and Sublime Degree of M.M., for the R.W.M, to welcome him formally to the Lodge as a Member who is now entitled to all the privileges. On the call of the R.W.M. the Brethren stand and give a Masonic welcome with o..., t..., t....

The Brother briefly replies.

CLOSING OF LODGE

R.W.M.(Gives one k...) Brethren, assist me to close the Lodge.

The Brethren stand at the s... of f....

R.W.M. — W.J.W., what is the constant care in a L. of M.M.s?

W.J.W. — To prove the L. closed tyled, R.W.M.

R.W.M. — Direct that duty to be done.

W.J.W. — Br. I.G., prove the L. close tyled.

The I.G. gives the k...s of the Degree, which are responded to by the T.

I.G. — W.J.W., the L. is close tyled.

W.J.W. — R.W.M., the L. is close tyled.

R.W.M. — W.S.W,, what is the next duty?

W.S.W. — To see that the Br. stand to order as M.M.s.

R.W.M. — To order, Br.. as M.M.s.

The Brethren give the s... of a M.M.

R.W.M. — W.J.W., whence come you?

W.J.W. — The W., R.W.M., whither we have been in search of the genuine s... of a M.M.

R.W.M. — W.S.W., have you been successful in your search?

W.S.W. — We have not, R.W.M., but we bring with us certain substituted s..., which, with your permission, we are willing to impart.

R.W.M. — Let these substituted s... be regularly communicated to me.

The W...s go to the centre of the L. and face each other; the J. gives the s..., g..., and w... on the f... p...s of f... in due form to the S.; the J. retires to his place; the S. then goes to about a yard in front of the R.W.M,

W.S.W. — R.W.M., deign to receive the substituted s... of a M.M.

R.W.M. — I will receive them with pleasure.

The R.W.M, leaves his chair and receives them as the S.W. had done; the S.W, salutes the M., and both return to their seats keeping up the p... s... until they arrive there.

R.W.M. — Br., these substituted s... of a M.M. which have thus been regularly communicated to me, I, as the R.W.M, of this L., and thereby the humble representative of K... S..., hereby sanction, confirm, and declare that they shall designate you, and all M.M.s throughout the world, until time or circumstances shall restore the genuine ones.

The Brethren give the g... or r... s... and exclaim, All glory to the M... H...

R.W.M. — W.S.W., what is your place in the Lodge?

W.S.W. — In the W., R.W.M.

R.W.M. — And your duty there? W.S.W. — To mark the setting sun, and to close the Lodge by your command after seeing that every Brother has had his just and lawful due, R.W.M.

R.W.M. — Have all the wages been paid?

W.S.W. — So far as due and demanded, R.W.M.

R.W.M. — The labours of the day being ended, and the wages paid so far as due and demanded, I now command you to close this Lodge.

W.S.W. — Br., in the name of the M... H... and by command of the R.W.M., I declare this L. of M.M.s duly closed, and this I do by — (gives the k...s of the Degree).

W.J.W. — And it is closed accordingly. (Gives the k...s of the Degree.)

The I.G, gives the k...s which are responded to by the T., after which the R.W.M. gives the k...s.

R.W.M. — W.S.W., how should M...s meet?

W.S.W. — On the L., R.W.M.

R.W.M. — W.J.W., how should they act?

W.J.W. — On the P., R.W.M.

R.W.M. — And part, Brethren, on the S.; so let us meet, act, and part.

Chaplain — And may the blessing of the rest upon us, and upon all true and faithful Brethren throughout the world; may brotherly love prevail, and every moral and social good cement us.

Brethren — So mote it be.

R.W.M. — Br., nothing now remains but, in accordance with our ancient custom, to lay aside our w... t...s, close the V.S.L., and lock up the secrets of our Order in the safe repository of our hearts, uniting in the act of fidelity, fidelity, fidelity. May God bless the King and the Craft. Unclothe and untyle.

SHORT METHOD OF RAISING THE LODGE TO THIRD DEGREE.

The R.W.M, rises in the E., gives one k..., at which the Brethren stand at the s... of f....

R.W.M. — W.S.W., will you be off or from?

W.S.W. — From, R.W.M.

R.W.M. — From what?

W.S.W. — From the Degree of F.C. to that of M.M.

R.W.M. — Brethren, by virtue of my office, I hereby declare the Lodge raised from the Degree of F.C. to that of M.M, and this I do by — .

The R.W.M. gives the k...s of the Third Degree, which are repeated by Wardens, I.G., and T.

R.W.M. — And this shall be your s...

He gives the s..., which is responded to by the Brethren.

R.W.M. — Be seated, Brethren. The Brethren seat themselves, the V.S.L. is opened at the proper place, and the c... and s... are placed in position.

SHORT METHOD OF REDUCING THE LODGE

The R.W.M. rises in the E., gives one k..., and the Brethren stand at the s... of f....

R.W.M. — W.S.W., will you be off or from?

W.S.W. — Off, R.W.M.

R.W.M. — Off what?

W.S.W. — Off the Degree of M.M. to that of F.C.

R.W.M. — Brethren, by virtue of in office, I hereby declare the Lodge reduced from the Degree of M.M. to that of F.C., and this I do by — .

The R.W.M. gives the k... of the Second Degree which are repeated by Wardens, I.G., and T.

R.W.M — And this, Brethren, shall be your s....

He gives the s... of a F.C. which is responded to by the Brethren.

The Brethren seat themselves, the V.S.L. is opened at the proper place, and the c... and s... are placed in position.


Dundee: T. M. Sparks, Crosswell Printing Works, 1917